GARDEN STATE ENVIRONET

Jul - 27
2017

GARDEN STATE ENVIRONET

GARDEN STATE ENVIRONET

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Garden State EnviroNews

981129

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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<*> MUSCONETCONG PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING – DEC 10
<*> DIAL EARTH’S 911 – RECYCLING INFORMATION
<*> LETTER TO NH GOVERNOR SHAHEEN ON MTBE
<*> CALENDAR

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MUSCONETCONG PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING – DEC 10

Date: 981129
From: 609-633-3812

November 24, 1998

Dear Committee Member,

The next Public Advisory Committee meeting has been scheduled for
December 10, 1998 at 7:00 PM. It will be held at the Pequest Trout
Hatchery, Oxford, NJ.

As you are aware, we have spent a great deal of time over the past
several months developing goal statements and a mission statement for
our watershed initiative. These goal statements required some simple
modifications to their language in order to reflect “goal statements”
for the watershed process and not issues.

It is now time to begin the serious work ahead. The purpose of this
meeting is to develop the following work groups: habitat, land use,
water resources, recreation/open space, nonpoint source and others
which the PAC finds necessary to address specific topics and issues.
These work groups will be responsible for outlining preliminary issues
within their broad topic area, developing an action plan, a work plan
and eventually writing a section of the watershed management plan.
Each group will provide their part of the PAC workplan and watershed
management plan.

These work groups are intended to be working teams and will not just
discuss but develop an implementation strategy. The work groups will
not make policy decisions. All policy decisions will be made by the
PAC. This will also be the time to begin working on the development of
the Characterization and Assessment Subcommittee to compile and assess
data about the watershed.

Work group membership is limited to ten people per the ten
stakeholder categories to keep it a manageable and effective group
(one person from each stakeholder group). If there are stakeholder
groups that choose not to be on a particular work group, then the work
group may choose whomever (a PAC member or not) they wish to serve on
the group.

It will be extremely important to attend this meeting if you wish to
be part of a work group. Representatives from all diverse backgrounds
are needed. If you have any questions, please contact Nick Zripko or
myself at 609-633-3812. We look forward to seeing you in December.
Thank you for your continued cooperation and efforts.

Sincerely,
Terri Romagna, Supervisor
Delaware River Basin

-=*=-

Musconetcong Watershed Association
POB 87
Washington NJ 07882
Tel: 908-638-8079

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DIAL EARTH’S 911 – RECYCLING INFORMATION

Date: Nov 27, 1998
From: editor@ens-news.com ENVIRONMENT NEWS SERVICE (ENS)

Earth’s 911 is America’s free 24 hour resource for geographically
specific environmental and recycling information. Just call
1-800-CLEANUP.

The service is made possible through a public/private partnership
between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National
Governor’s Association, all 50 states, and dozens of national and
local public and private organizations. These organizations have
enabled the expansion of Earth’s 911 across the nation and into
Canada. The program will soon be utilized around the globe.

This information includes the user’s nearest recycling center, local
environmental programs, important environmental phone numbers, how to
buy recycled products, and how to handle household hazardous waste.
The Earth’s 911 partnership is working to expand the system to include
air and water quality, energy, and community specific volunteerism
information.

Users can request additional information through the message section.

Online at:
http://www.1800cleanup.org

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LETTER TO NH GOVERNOR SHAHEEN ON MTBE

Date: Nov 24, 1998
From: Jrmeinhold@aol.com

John Meinhold, O.D.
P.O. Box 5271
Portsmouth, NH 03802

Governor Jeanne Shaheen
State House
Concord, NH 03301

November 24, 1998

Dear Governor Shaheen

I am responding to your recent letter to me concerning the gasoline
additive MTBE. I was pleased to know you are concerned and working on
this very significant threat to our water supplies. I am in full
agreement with you that this problem needs to be addressed from a
regional perspective. In fact, I think it needs to be addressed from a
national perspective too. I think it is wonderful you are taking a
leadership role on the MTBE issue. However, there is also good reason
to immediately work locally on water protection until a regional
solution can be found.

MTBE could have devastating effects to NH’s economy if it is
continued to be used. From your letter, I am concerned that you may
not be aware of the full scope of the water hazard from MTBE.
Furthermore, I am alarmed that statewide water protection advisories to
private well owners handling MTBE gasoline have not been made as of
the writing of this letter. Finally, I have concerns with recent
public statements made in the press about MTBE by NESCAUM (Northeast
States Coordinated Air Use Management), which is the group you are
seeking guidance from for a course of action.

The major problem with MTBE is that it is incredibly soluble in
water. It is 50 times more soluble in water than the other toxic
chemicals found in gasoline. MTBE moves faster and farther into
groundwater than the other chemicals in gasoline. In fact, the US
Geological Survey (USGS) has identified MTBE to be the second most
commonly found volatile organic compound (VOC) in groundwater
nationwide. In addition, a study by S.J. Grady of the USGS found MTBE
was the “most frequently detected VOC” in New England groundwater
between 1993-1995.

It takes only very small amounts of MTBE to contaminate massive
amounts of water. The USGS found 1 gallon of reformulated gasoline can
contaminate 4 million gallons of water with MTBE resulting in a 20
parts per billion level of MTBE. 20 parts per billion is the lower
level recommended by a 1997 US EPA Advisory on MTBE in drinking water

Maine’s random well survey has now proven just how dangerous MTBE can
be to water. As you know, Maine found that possibly 1% or 4,300 of
their private wells are contaminated above safe drinking water levels
with MTBE. Maine predicted 5,600 of their private wells would be
contaminated if they use the 20 parts per billion level, as
recommended by the 1997 US EPA Advisory on MTBE in drinking water.

The really alarming part of the Maine water well survey was a finding
that very small gasoline spills, even less than half a gallon, within
1000 feet of a well can contaminate a private drinking water well and
/or a neighbor’s well.

MTBE also has serious affects on the aesthetic quality of water. It
causes water to taste and smell like turpentine at very low levels.
Some individuals can taste MTBE at even 2 parts per billion levels.
One study showed most people can detect “the presence” of MTBE around
14 parts per billion.

There have been 3 independent animal cancer studies done on MTBE. The
results of all 3 of these studies were alarming: MTBE has been shown
to be a multi-site carcinogen in animals causing lymphoma, leukemia,
liver tumors, kidney tumors, and testicular tumors.

A legislatively mandated major study on MTBE was released very
recently from the University of California at Davis. This study has
found that MTBE is not effective in cleaning air since modern
technology vehicles already have improved emission systems. Most
importantly, the study found that the continued use of MTBE may cost
California as much as $1.5 billion annually to clean up MTBE
contamination.

POSSIBLE ECONOMIC IMPACTS TO NH’s ECONOMY FROM CONTINUED MTBE USE:

* Very High Cleanup Costs: The high solubility of MTBE in water makes
it very difficult and expensive to clean up

* Boating Restrictions or Boating Prohibitions on waterbodies used
for drinking water : The two stroke motor boat engines in most
motor boats and all jet skis are inefficient and result in about 25%
of unburned fuel being discharged into waterways. Motor boat
engines and jet skis using reformulated gasoline are a major source
of MTBE contamination for a reservoir or drinking water lake.
California has had to recently prohibit boating activities on
several waterbodies because of MTBE contamination.

* Decreased Property Values: Communities with contaminated wells that
do not have a municipal water source could be devastated by
decreased property values.

* Spring Water Industry Impacts : The spring water industry maybe one
of the most rapidly growing industries in our state. The USGS has
found MTBE can penetrate into deep aquifers. A significant
reformulated gasoline spill near one of our spring water sources
has the potential to shut down a spring water company.

Harry Stewart, NH DES Water Division administrator, when asked what NH
would probably find if we did a random well survey, said in a Nov 1,
1998, Boston Globe article, “In New Hampshire, we’d probably see about
the same results (as the Maine survey).” This means, that NH, which
Mr. Stewart has said has 35% of its population dependent on private
water wells, should have hundreds if not thousands of private wells
with very significant levels of MTBE contamination. I talked with Mr.
Stewart about 2 weeks ago and he confirmed that he believes NH should
have the same levels of MTBE contamination as Maine in its private
water wells. He also noted how impressed he was with how the Maine
MTBE water well survey was performed. I asked Mr. Stewart why a
statewide media advisory was not being done to advise NH citizens on
the safe handling of reformulated gasoline around private wells. Mr.
Stewart thought this was a good idea; however, to date, I have still
not heard of such a statewide advisory to help NH citizens know how to
protect their private water wells from MTBE. Also, citizens should be
notified of risk factors involved to alert them to get their well
water checked for MTBE contamination. The public also needs to know
where they can go to get their water tested and the costs involved.

Governor Shaheen, I am very concerned that our citizens have not been
informed about the dangers of reformulated gasoline to our water
supplies, and what risk factors there are to alert them to get their
well water checked to rule out possible contamination. Here are some
of areas of which I feel need to be addressed in order to try to limit
MTBE contamination to our water supplies:

* NH citizens need to know how to safely handle reformulated gasoline
around private wells. This information should be widely publicized.
I also think it would be great if you would consider perhaps
participating in a public service announcement about how important
it is to be cautious of gasoline spills around private wells.

* People need to be advised of risk factors to alert them to get
their water wells checked to rule out MTBE contamination (ie. gas
spill in last 2 years, storage of old vehicles on the property,
unusual taste of water, etc.) They also need to know where to go to
get water test kits and the cost involved.

* NH citizens and especially boaters and tourists need to be advised
to be extra cautious in handling reformulated gasoline around water
bodies (ie lakes and ponds). Perhaps even a brochure could be made
for the NH welcome centers.

* Ice fishermen that use gasoline for motorized augers need to be
advised of the safe handling of gasoline (ie should make sure they
fill their auger gas tanks before being on lake and should be
prohibited from putting a gasoline can on the ice surface because
of the great potential of direct spills. In addition, the police
force should be especially vigilant to stop vehicles from going
onto fragile ice (ie forming ice or melting ice). A vehicle falling
through the ice that results in 20 to 30 gallons of gasoline mixing
with a lakes water could be an absolute catastrophe.

I am greatly concerned that the state has not lowered the safe
drinking water standard for MTBE. NH is currently using 70 parts per
billion (ppb) level of MTBE for a safe drinking water standard. This
standard should be immediately changed because of the following:

* The US EPA issued an MTBE Drinking Water Advisory in December 1997
recommending “20-40 ppb or below to protect consumer acceptance of
the water resource (and) provide a large margin of safety from
toxic effects.”

* On November 12, 1998, the California Department of Health proposed
a new drinking water regulation of 5 ppb for MTBE to protect the
aesthetic quality of water. The department set this limit to
ensure that MTBE can not be smelled or tasted. The department will
also be reviewing a primary drinking water standard for MTBE at 14
ppb based on the potential of MTBE to affect human health.

* Dr. Myron Mehlman, the previous Director of Toxicology for Mobil
Oil, was quoted this year in the International Journal of
Occupational and Environmental Health saying , “to reduce or
prevent unnecessary risks of individuals developing cancers, the
drinking water standard for MTBE throughout the country should be 1
to 5 ppb.”

In your letter to me you indicated you have asked the group NESCAUM
for guidance on alternatives to MTBE. On Oct 28, 1998, in USA Today,
the executive director for NESCAUM, Jason Grumet, wrote an editorial
on MTBE with a byline of, “More study needed to assess MTBE’s
potential harm.” Governor Shaheen, based on the information from
Maine’s water well study and the recent exhaustive study released by
the UC at Davis, our state definitely does not need to study MTBE
anymore. It is only time for action. We must find an alternative at
the earliest possible date.

Mr. Grumet was also quoted in the article saying, “The most robust
solution is to stop the leaking and spilling of all gasoline.”
Gasoline, and the spills that will inevitably occur, are definitely a
part of our ecosystem in our country. It is ridiculous to think we can
stop all leaks and spills of gasoline. The real solution is to ensure
that the gasoline chemical components will have minimal environmental
impacts.

Governor Shaheen, MTBE must be removed from our gasoline — It is
the only solution to this problem.

John Meinhold, O.D.
Chair, Environment and Health Committee
NH Sierra Club

cc:Senator Katie Wheeler
Senator Burt Cohen
Senator Rick Russman
Rep Mary Ellen Martin
Rep Betty Hall
Rep Derek Owens
Rep Jeff MacGillivrary

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CALENDAR

Date: 981129
From: mailbox@gsenet.org

Nov 30 : Mon : 8:00pm
NJ TRANSIT’S SHORTCHANGING OF BERGEN COUNTY
Transit Committee of Bergen County
Leonia NJ, contact: wantsrail@usa.net
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Dec 1 : Tue : 6:00pm
MORRIS COUNTY CROSS-ACCEPTANCE REPORT NEGOTIATION
Morris County Department of Planning & Development
Morristown NJ, contact: 973-829-8120

Dec 2 : Wed
INDUSTRIAL SITE RECOVERY ACT (ISRA) COURSE
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

Dec 2 : Wed : 6:30pm-9:00pm
SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT HEARINGS
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Morristown NJ, contact: 732-280-8988 agoldsmith@cleanwater.org
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Dec 4 : Fri : 4:00pm
SAFETY KLEEN HAZARDOUS WASTE HEARING
Logan Township NJ, contact: 609-467-3100

Dec 5 : Sat : 9:00am-1:00pm
GIS MAPPING WORKSHOP FOR THE COOPER RIVER WATERS
Environmental Commission of Camden County
Cherry Hill NJ, contact: 609-566-3131 PKroll@aol.com
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Dec 6 : Sun : 9:30am
ABRAM HEWITT STATE FOREST HIKE
Sierra Club North Jersey Group
Hewitt NJ, contact: 201-489-9321

Dec 6 : Sun : 10:00am-1:00pm
HOLIDAY HIKE
Weis Ecology Center
Ringwood NJ, contact: 973-835-2160

Dec 9 : Wed : 7:30pm
SIERRA CLUB LOANTAKA GROUP MEETING
Chatham NJ, contact: 908-771-9676 or
robert.warren.johnson@worldnet.att.net

Dec 9 : Wed : 7:00pm
GREAT FALLS DEVELOPMENT – PLANNING BOARD MEETING
Friends of the Great Falls
Paterson NJ, contact: 973-279-1097 cctoo@earthlink.net
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Dec 10 : Thu : 7:00pm
MUSCONETCONG PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Oxford NJ, contact: 609-633-3812
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Dec 10 : Thu
SEWER EXTENSIONS COURSE
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

Dec 11 : Fri : 7:00pm-8:30pm
FESTIVAL OF THE WOODS
Weis Ecology Center
Ringwood NJ, contact: 973-835-2160

Dec 12 : Sat : 9:00am-2:30pm
BIRD SEED SALE DAY
Weis Ecology Center
Ringwood NJ, contact: 973-835-2160

Dec 12 : Sat : 7:00pm-8:30pm
FESTIVAL OF THE WOODS
Weis Ecology Center
Ringwood NJ, contact: 973-835-2160

Dec 14 & 15 : Mon & Tue
SOLVING STORMWATER AND NPS POLLUTION MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS IN NJ
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Dec 17 : Thu : 6:00pm
MORRIS COUNTY CROSS-ACCEPTANCE REPORT NEGOTIATION
Morris County Department of Planning & Development
Morristown NJ, contact: 973-829-8120

Dec 20 : Sun : 9:30am
CANNONBALL TRAIL HIKE
Sierra Club North Jersey Group
Pompton Lakes NJ, contact: 201-489-9321

Jan 1 : Fri : 9:30am
FLAT ROCK BROOK NATURE CENTER HIKE
Sierra Club North Jersey Group
Englewood NJ, contact: 201-489-9321

Jan 12-15 : Tue-Fri
FUNDAMENTALS OF GIS: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Jan 15-16 : Fri-Sat
14TH ANNUAL ANJEE CONFERENCE
Alliance for New Jersey Environmental Education
Lawrenceville NJ, contact: 908-766-2489

Jan 20 : Wed
THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT – REGULATORY UPDATE
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Jan 26 : Tue
PROTECTING WATERSHEDS IN CENTRAL & SOUTHERN NJ
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Jan 27 : Wed
THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT – REGULATORY UPDATE
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu
[Details: http://www.gsenet.org/conf.htm]

Jan 28-29 : Thu-Fri
STABILIZATION AND RESTORATION OF DISTURBED SITES
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

Feb 4 : Thu
WETLAND LAWS AND REGULATIONS
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

Feb 24-26 : Wed-Fri
PLANNING HYDROLOGY FOR WETLAND CONSTRUCTION
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

Mar 4 : Thu
THE IMPACT OF WETLANDS AND CONTAMINATED SITES ON REAL PROPERTY
TAX APPEALS
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

Mar 15-16 : Mon-Tue
THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES: REGULATIONS, IDENTIFICATION
AND ASSESSMENT
Cook College Office of Continuing Professional Education
New Brunswick NJ, contact: 732-932-9271 ocpe@aesop.rutgers.edu

May 15-22 : Sat-Sat
NATIONAL RIVER CLEANUP WEEK
America Outdoors
Contact: 423-558-3595 http://www.americaoutdoors.org

Jun 6-9 : Sun-Wed
KEEP AMERICA GROWING: BALANCING WORKING LANDS AND DEVELOPMENT
Philadelphia PA, contact: 802-655-7215 delaney@together.net

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Back issues of the Garden State EnviroNews are available at
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